Coleman Lineage

THE COLEMAN NAME

The name Coleman is a very ancient English name of germanic origin. It was probably introduced into Britain by the Norman conquerors in 1066 — there being no surnames in general use by the English or Danes in pre-conquest times. It was recorded as a personal name in the Domesday Book in 1086. Throughout English history, the nameColeman has been primarily noted among yeoman, tradesmen, and farmers — not among the nobility.

The name was introduced into America in the early 1600’s when several men named Coleman arrived in the Colonies. One of these men was THOMAS COLEMAN, who left Evesham, Worchestershire, England with his family, and settled on the northwest frontier in Wethersfield, Connecticut.

PREFACE

Between the years 1620 and 1640, English citizens — living in a changing society and an atmosphere of revolt against the royal government — were faced with economic depression, plagues, new taxes, bad harvests, and overcrowding. Those insisting on religious freedom, or reform of the Church of England, were suffering for their convictions. Except for the eldest son, most men could not expect to inherit enough land to farm independently. In view of the success of the early colonists, many chose to push against their horizons and venture into the new world. As many as 20,000 people left England for the American Colonies between 1620 and 1640. Most were solid citizens — farmers and craftsmen — who came in family groups, determined to run their own affairs on the basis of discipline, law, and order … but free from bishops, royal officials, and tax collectors. Among them was Thomas Coleman and his family.

1985 marked the 350th anniversary of the landing of Thomas Coleman in the American Colonies in 1635. This account of one line of his descendants is dedicated to the memory of Hannah (Porter) Coleman and her eleven month old daughter, Bethia, who were killed by Indians during an attack on their home during harvest time … in 1677.

A genealogy of the first five generations of the family in America was recorded by Henry R. Stiles in the History of Ancient Wethersfield, Volume II. A genealogy of the first three generations can also be found in “Genealogies of Hadley Families,” by Lucius M. Boltwood, which is appended to the History of Hadley, Massachusetts, by Sylvester Judd. Both works contain numerous references and accounts of the early members of the Coleman family.

References to members of the sixth and seventh generations of this line of the Coleman family are recorded in the following local histories:

Blackman, Emily C., History of Susquehanna County, Pennsylvania.
J.H. Beers and Company, Commemorative Biographical Record of Eastern Pennsylvania.
Craft, (Rev.) David, History of Bradford County, Pennsylvania.
Heverly, Clement F., Pioneer and Patriot Families of Bradford County Pennsylvania.
Stocker, Rhamanthus M., Centennial History of Susquehanna County, Pennsylvania.

Researchers will find that a second Thomas Coleman, from Marlborough, Wiltshire, England, also landed in the Colonies about 1635. However, he settled and died in Nantucket, Massachusetts. Take care not to confuse the two families.

In this account, each person’s name is spelled as it appears in the early records, and may not conform to contemporary or current practice.

Have fun shaking our family tree. Read about our ancestors. Not just my dull, genealogical prose with its names, dates, places, and issue, but between the lines. Visit the sites of their homes and their final resting places. Live with them and their neighbors. Suffer their hardships, and rejoice in their triumphs. Each filled their place in history — as will you.

Imagine the thoughts of Thomas Coleman while sailing toward a new land when all of America was a frontier. Be with (Dea.) John Coleman as he runs from the fields, clutching his flintlock, to find his wife and baby killed by Indians, and two of his children taken captive. Walk the Indian trails with Thomas and Anna and their children to settle in the Susquehanna Valley of Pennsylvania — only a few years after the Wyoming Massacre. Plant your corn between the stumps of the trees you cut down for your cabin, and grind your corn in the samp mill. Sit at the spinning wheel in candle light, and back on the open hearth. And, yes, use the outhouse — summer and winter.

Join Orrin Coleman during the bloody fighting at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, and in winter quarters at Falmouth, Virginia. Suffer through the great depression of the 1930’s, and sail in the North Atlantic convoys during both World Wars. Watch with astonishment as the industrial revolution and the age of flight, of atomic energy, and of computers unfolds — and man lands on the moon.

Enjoy the spectacle, the color, and the drama of living history with YOUR family. Expand on what I have done and recorded here. Correct my mistakes. Search for additional records and information about their lives and times. Research allied families. I envy you the opportunity and the excitement of each new discovery.
1987 at Binghamton, New York
Clayton Worden Coleman

LINEAGE

THOMAS COLEMAN was born about 1598 in England — ten years after the defeat of the Spanish Armada, and nine years before the Jamestown Colony was founded in America. He died on 1 October 1674 in Hadley, Massachusetts. He married first in England. Although her name is not recorded, his first wife is believed to have died about 1642 in Wethersfield, Connecticut. He married (2) Mrs. Frances (widow of Hugh, Sr.) Wells, who had three children by her first marriage. She died on 16 March 1678 in Hadley.

Thomas Coleman left his home in Evedham, Worchestershire, England with his wife and baby son, John, about 1635 — fifteen years after the Pilgrims first landed at Plymouth, Massachusetts. He was one of the first settlers of Wethersfield, Connecticut in 1636. He was highly regarded in Wethersfield, and was frequently involved with civic responsibilities and litigation. According to accounts, “He was his own man.” His children and grandchildren married into the very best families in Wethersfield.

On 18 April 1659, as a result of a controversy withing the Church of Wethersfield, Thomas signed a petition with 57 other men asking permission to move up the Connecticut River to start a new plantation. When permission was granted he became one of the first settlers of Hadley.

Outspoken Thomas Coleman, being “his own man,” naturally was a member of the Congregational Church in Colonial New England — a Puritan group bent on remaking, rather than separating from the Church of England. It was this dominant element, which affirmed the essential importance and autonomy of the local congregation, which created the religious and political institutions by which the new Massachusetts Bay Colony was shaped. The first six generations of this line of the Coleman family in America were members of the Congregational Church.

Thomas Coleman was a large landowner and left a good estate, including a house in Evesham, England. His will is recorded in Volume 1, page 175, in the Probate Court at Northampton, Massachusetts. The will of his widow, Frances, is also recorded in Volume 1, page 199.
CHILDREN BY FIRST MARRIAGE

1. (Dea.) John, born about 1635 in England, died 21 January 1711 in Hatfield, Massachusetts, married (1) Hannah Porter on 29 May 1663, (2) Mehitable (Johnson) Root on 11 March 1679, (3) Mary (Day) Stebbens on 16 December 1696.

2. Esther, born about 1637 in Wethersfield, married Philip Davis.

3. Noah, born about 1640 in Wethersfield , died 20 July 1676 in Hadley, married Mary Crow on 27 December 1686 in Hadley.

4. Sarah, born about 1642 in Wethersfield, died 23 August 1734 in Wethersfield, married Richard Treat, Jr. about 1661.

CHILDREN BY SECOND MARRIAGE

1. Deborah, born about 1645 in Standfield Township, Hartford County, Connecticut, died about 1703, married Daniel Gunn about 1672.

(Dea.) JOHN COLEMAN, the son of Thomas Coleman and , was born about 1635 in England. He died on 21 January 1711 in Hatfield, Massachusetts. He married (1) Hannah Porter, the daughter of John Porter and Rose , on 29 May 1663 in Windsor Township, Hartford County, Connecticut. She was born on 4 September 1642 in Windsor Township, and was slain on 19 September 1677 in Hatfield. He married (2) Mehitable Johnson, the daughter of Humphrey Johnson, on 11 March 1679. She was the widow of John Root, and the widow of Samuel Hinsdale. She died on 4 August 1689. He married (3) Mary Day, the daughter of Robert Day and Editha Stebbens, and the widow of Samuel Ely on 16 December 1696. She died on 17 October 1725. John Coleman was called “Deacon John” in the records of Wethersfield, Connecticutt.

(Dea.) John Coleman joined his father, and others from Wethersfield, to become a first settler in Hadley, Massachusetts about 1660. By 1668 he had settled across the Connecticut River in Hatfield. On 19 September 1677, a year after the war with the Indians was apparently over (King Philip’s War, 1675 to 1676) about 27 Indians made an unexpected attack on the settlement of Hatfield at about eleven o’clock in the morning while the men were in the fields. Twelve people were killed, four wounded, seventeen captives were taken, and buildings were burned. All ecept five of those killed, wounded, or captured were women and children.

Among those killed during the attack were Hannah, wife of (Dea.) John, and their eleven month old daughter, Bethia. Four year old Sarah and another Coleman child were taken captive. Still another Coleman child was left wounded, and John Coleman’s barn was burned.

The Indians took their captives up the Connecticut River, killing and taking more captives at Deerfield, Massachusetts. Immediate pursuit failed, and in October the captives were taken up the river and across country to Lake Champlain. After some delay, they proceeded up the lake by canoe, arriving in Canada during the winter. They were the first of hundreds of later captives to be taken to Canada by this route during the French and Indian Wars.

Benjamin Waite and Stephen Jennings left Hatfield on 24 October 1677 to find and recove the captives, among whom were their wives and children. The authorities frowned upon their enterprise, and they were brought back by force. They secretly hired a friendly Mohawk Indian to guide them to Lake George. They proceeded up Lake George and Lake Champlain by canoe to reach Chamblee, Canada on 6 January 1678. They were the first New England men to travel up the lake route to Canada. They found all but three of the captives at Sorell, Quebec, Canada, on the St. Lawrence River. The French Governor treated the Americans civilly, and they left Quebec on 19 April 1678, arriving in Albany, New York on Wednesday, 22 May 1678 after 8 months of captivity.

(Dea.) John Coleman’s will, dated 19 January 1711, can be found in Volume 3, page 261, of the Probate Court Records at Northampton, Massachusetts. He left a sizeable estate, including lands in Wethersfield to his son, (Lieut) John Coleman.

CHILDREN BY FIRST MARRIAGE

1. Thomas, born 3 March 1664 in Hadley, died about 1674 in Hatfield, unmarried.

2. Hannah, born 14 February 1667 in Hadley, died in July 1722, married Thomas Nash in August 1685.

3. (Lieut.) John, born 11 April 1669 in Hatfield, died in Wethersfield, married Hannah Wright on 24 April 1695 in Wethersfield.

4. Noah, born 20 December 1671 in Hatfield, died about 1711 in Colchester, Connecticut, married Hannah .

5. Sarah, born 15 February 1673 in Hatfield, married John Field.

6. Bethia, born 14 October 1676 in Hatfield, slain by Indians on 19 September 1677 in Hatfield.

CHILDREN BY SECOND MARRIAGE

1. Ebenezer, born 29 August 1680 in Hatfield, died about 1741 in Colchester, Connecticut, married Ruth Nichols on 11 March 1705.

2. Nathaniel, born 18 October 1684 in Hatfield, died 7 April 1755 in Hatfield, married Mary Ely about 1705.

**********************

(Lieut.) JOHN COLEMAN, the son of (Dea.) John Coleman and Hannah Porter, was born 11 April 1669 in Hatfield, Massachusetts. He died about in Wethersfield, Connecticut. He married Hannah Wright, the daughter of James Wright and Dorcas Weede, on 24 April 1695 in Wethersfield. She was born about 1670, and died on 1 August 1741 in Wethersfield.

John Coleman is called “Lieutenant John” in the records of Wethersfield. He was a large landowner, both by inheritance and purchase, and a prominent man of affairs. His will is dated 7 May 1746. An inventory of his estate, taken in 1735, totaled over 1912 pounds.

CHILDREN

1. Mary, born 13 December 1695 in Wethersfield, married Aaron Owen.

2. John, Jr., born 12 May 1698 in Wethersfield, married Comfort Robbins about 1726.

3. (Capt.) Thomas, born 6 June 1701 in Wethersfield, died about 1735, apparently unmarried.

4. Hannah, born 25 September 1704 in Wethersfield, died 15 March 1762 in Middletown, Connecticut, married Ebenezer Sage.

5. Elisha, born 8 October 1707 in Wethersfield, died about 1763 in Wethersfield, married Anne Rose about 1737.

6. Nathaniel, born about 1712 in Wethersfield, died 16 April 1767, married (1) Ruth Beadle on 19 January 1744, (2) Comfort Loveman on 23 November 1752.

7. Tabitha, born about 1715 in Wethersfield, died 17 September 1785, married Jonathan Bigelow in 1736.

8. Ebenezer, died probably before 1735.

*************************

JOHN COLEMAN, JR., the son of (Lieut.) John Coleman and Hannah Wright, was born on 12 May 1698 in Wethersfield, Connecticut (CN Vital Records–Barbour Collection–Volume 1, page 47). He died about in , Connecticut. He married Comfort Robbins (#498), the daughter of (Capt.) Joshua Robbins and Elizabeth Butler, about 1726. She was born in 1699.

In the Probate Court Records of Distribution in Hartford, Connecticut, John Coleman acknowledged receiving his share of the estate of his brother, (Capt.) Thomas Coleman, on 4 February 1738.

CHILDREN

1. Comfort, born 24 August 1727 in Wethersfield, married Crafts Goodrich on 20 April 1749 in Bolton, Connecticut.

2. John, born 27 July 1729 in Wethersfield, died 8 September 1807 in Bolton, Connecticut, married (1) Deliverence Baker on 27 December 1743 in Bolton, (2) Mary Woodruff on 20 January 1774 in Bolton, (3) Mary Howard on 12 December 1782 in Bolton.

3. Elizabeth, born 24 October 1731 in Wethersfield.

4. Hannah, born 19 September 1734 in Wethersfield, married Stephen Griswold on 10 January 1751 in Bolton, Connecticut.

5. Thomas, born 28 May 1737 in Wethersfield, died about 1812 in Bradford County, Pennsylvania, married (1) Mary Smith on 5 April 1759 in Coventry, Connecticut, (2) Anna Shaylor on 25 November 1766 in Bolton.

6. Mary, born in March 1740 in Wethersfield, died 1 September 1741 in Wethersfield.

*************************

THOMAS COLEMAN, the son of John Coleman, Jr. and Comfort Robbins, was born on 28 May 1737 in Wethersfield, Connecticut (CN Vital Records–Barbour Collection–Volume 1, page 106). He died about 1812 in Bradford County, Pennsylvania. He married (1) Mary Smith, the daughter of Benjamin Smith and Mary Roberson, on 5 April 1759 in Coventry, Connecticut–he being from Bolton,Connecticut. She was born on 24 April 1740 in Coventry, and died on 6 August 1762 in Bolton. He married (2) Anna Shaylor (#508), the daughter of Ephraim Shaylor and Eunice Wright, on 25 November 1766 in Bolton. She was born about 1744, and was baptized in 1756 in Haddam, Connecticut. She died before 1820 in Bradford County, Pennsylvania.

Thomas Coleman was on of the Connecticut Settlers in the Susquehanna Valley of Pennsylvania during the Yankee-Pennamite land wars, when both Connecticut and Pennsylvania claimed what is now northern Pennsylvania. He left Bolton with his family after his son, Reuben, was baptized in 1781, probably stopping for a time in Litchfield, Connecticut before moving on to the Wyoming Valley of Pennsylvania. He appears in the 1790 census in Luzerne County, Pennsylvania, and was one of the Connecticut Settlers to sign a petition on 13 September 1796 to the Connecticut General Assembly for assistance with their land claimes (Susquehanna Company Papers, Vol. 10, page 381).

On 20 September 1797 he bought 132 acres of land, for 150 pounds, in Springfield Township (Deed Book 6, page 397 in the Luzerne County Courthouse, Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania) which is now encompassed by Wyalusing Township, Bradford County, Pennsylvania. He sold the land for 100 pounds on 10 July 1799 (Deed Book 6, page 381 in the Luzerne County Courthouse) warranting title except against claims by Pennsylvania. He is recorded in the 1800 census in Wyalusing, Luzerne County (now in Bradford County). On 20 July 1801, a group of Connecticut landholdrs wrote to the Committee of Pennsylvania Landholders offering to compromise in the matter of land claims. The subscribers included Thomas Coleman and his sons, Darius and Reuben (Susquehanna Company Papers, Vol. 11, page 136).

Thomas Coleman was on the Assessment Rolls of Smithfield Township, Bradford County in 1812 when Bradford County was being formed–but he was not on the Rolls in 1819. Thomas’s son, Darius, moved to Middletown Township, Susquehanna County, Pennsylvania about 1801 where he appears on the Assessment Rolls in 1802. Thomas’s son, Reuben, moved to Pike Township, Bradford County about 1801 where he appears on the Assessment Rolls in 1812.

Thomas Coleman’s home in Wyalusing was, undoubtedly, a small, single room, log cabin with a dirt floor–as were all of the homes of the early settlers. The Colemans were reported to be masons–building chimneys for settler’s log cabins. Constructed of sticks and mud, the chimneys were large enough to be built using inside scaffolding.

CHILDREN BY FIRST MARRIAGE

1. Mary, born 1 June 1760 in Bolton, baptized 12 October 1760 in Bolton.

2. Rhoda, born 25 May 1762 in Bolton, baptized 30 May 1762 in Bolton, died 29 November 1762 in Bolton.

CHILDREN BY SECOND MARRIAGE

1. Anna, born 3 March 1768 in Bolton, baptized 11 September 1768 in Bolton.

2. Thomas, born 2 January 1769 in Bolton, baptized 15 January 1769 in Bolton.

3. Amos, born 28 May 1771 in Bolton, aptized 16 June 1771 in Bolton.

4. ____ , born about 1773 (female required by 1790 and 1800 census).

5. Rhoda, baptized 18 August 1779 in Bolton.

6. Darius, baptized 18 August 1779 in Bolton, died 2 June 1837 in Middletown Township, Susquehanna County, Pennsylvania, buried in the Darius Coleman Cemetery in Middletown Township with an inscribed headstone, married Sally Northrup.

7. Reuben L., baptized 14 August 1781 in Bolton, died 3 June 1848 in Pike Township, Bradford County, Pennsylvania, buried in East Herrick Cemetery with an inscribed headstone (apparently the year is wrong) married Jane Scott.

8. Elijah, born about 1787, probably in Litchfield, Connecticut (the Litchfield Church records are lost) died in August 1845 in Bradford County, Pennsylvania, buried in East Herrick Cemetery with an inscribed headstone, married Milly Shippy.

9. Sarah Ann, born about 1790, died after the 1850 census in Bradford County, Pennsylvania, married Joseph S. Browning.

************************

REUBEN L. COLEMAN, the son of Thomas Coleman and Anna Shaylor, was baptized on 14 August 1781 in Bolton, Connecticut (Records of the Congregational Church of Bolton, CN–Vol. 2, page 17). He died on 3 June 1848 in Pike Township, Bradford County, Pennsylvania, and is buried in the East Herrick Cemetery in Bradford County. The date on his inscribed headston (1847) is apparently wrong (see date on deed to his son Orrin). He married Jane Scott, the daughter of Scott and , about 1806. She was born about 1788 in , New Jersey, and died on 4 January 1870 in Bradford County. She is buried next to her husband with an inscribed headstone.

Reuben L. Coleman moved from Wyalusing, Bradford County, Pennsylvania to Pike Township in Bradford County about 1801. He built the second cabin on Rockwell Creek. He and his sons cleared more land than any other family in Pike Township. he worked all his life as a farmer. In 1810 he owned — according to the census records — one horse, four cows, and seventeen sheep. By deed dated 8 April 1848, recorded in Book 29, page 12 in the Bradford County Courthouse, Towanda, Pennsylvania, Reuben and Jane gave land to their son, Orrin H. Coleman, “…for and in consideration of the love which we have for him…” Similar gifts were made at that time to their other sons.

CHILDREN

1. Medina (Dima), born about 1808 in Bradford County, married Isaac Camp on 10 January 1831.

2. Betsey M., born about 1809 in Bradford County, died 30 May 1883 in Republic County, Kansas, married Jonathan Camp on 13 January 1829.

3. Sheeler D., born about 1810 in Bradford County, died before 1870 married Catherine Coats.

4. Archibald, born 26 August 1812 in Bradford County, died 3 March 1893 in Bradford County, buried in East Herrick Cemetery with an inscribed headstone, married Mirinda Walker in 1839 (first couple married in Orwell Township, Bradford County).

5. Reuben, born about 1815 in Bradford County, married (1) Ursula Coats, (2) Ann Esseltine.

6. Nathan, born about 1817 in Bradford County, died 25 March 1880 in Bradford County, buried in East Herrick Cemetery with an inscribed headstone, married Parmelia Brewster.

7. Rhoda, born about 1819 in Bradford County, died about 1866, married Caleb Heath.

8. Roswell, born 8 July 1820 in Bradford County, died 11 June 1887, buried in Darius Coleman Cemetery in Susquehanna County, Pennsylvania with an inscribed headstone, married Rowena Walker.

9. Clarrissa (Clara), born in 1822 in Bradford County, died in 1886 in Bradford County, buried in East Herrick Cemetery with an inscribed headstone, married William H. Cline.

10. Russell, born 15 March 1823 in Bradford County, died 5 October 1912 in West Pittston, Pennsylvania, buried in East Herrick Cemetery with an inscribed headstone, married (1) Harriet Goodell, (2) Frances Rodgers on 3 March 1869.

11. Joseph, born 13 March 1825 in Bradford County, died on 8 April 1887 in Bradford County, buried in East Herrick Cemetery with an inscribed headstone, married Caroline Irene Buttles on 7 October 1847 in East Herrick, Bradford, Pennsylvania.

12. Orrin H., born 9 March 1827 in Bradford County, died 8 August 1903 in Binghamton, New York, buried in Floral Park Cemetery in Johnson City, New York, married Susan Palmer on 24 February 1848 in Bradford County (a double wedding with twin sister, Jemima, and Orrin’s brother, Homer).

13. Homer S., born 20 April 1828 in Bradford County, died 18 March 1900 in Bradford County, buried in East Herrick Cemetery with an inscribed headstone, married Jemima Palmer on 24 February 1848.

*************************

ORRIN H. COLEMAN, the son of Reuben L. Coleman and Jane Scott, was born on 9 March 1827 in Pike Township, Bradford County, Pennsylvania. He died on 8 August 1903 in Binghamton, New York, and is buried in Floral Park Cemetery in Johnson City, New York with an inscribed headstone. On 24 February 1848 he married Susan B. Palmer, the daughter of Palmer and Mary M. , in a double wedding with his brother, Homer and Susan’s twin sister, Jemima. The evening ceremony in Pike Township was performed by Calvin Stone, Justice of the Peace. Susan B. Palmer was born on 10 May 1830 in Wantage, Sussex County, New Jersey, and died on 16 October 1916 in Binghamton. She is buried next to her husband with an inscribed headstone.

Orrin was a farmer in Bradford County, and in 1850 owned property in Pike Township valued at #300.00. At that time, Homer and Jemima, with their one year old daughter, Frances, were living with Orrin and Susan, and their one year old son, David.

On 7 August 1862, responding to President Lincoln’s call for volunteers, Orrin enlisted in Company A of the 141st Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers at Wyalusing, PA. The Company traveled to Harrisburg, Pennsylvania where they were mustered into the Union Army on 2 September 1862. Orrin was a Private during the Civil War, and participated in the Battle of Fredericksburg. After failing to take the City, the Union forces withdrew back across the Rappahannock River to Falmouth, Virginia to enter winter quarters.

On 25 December 1862, while cutting poles to build log tents, Orrin accidentally cut the fingers of his left hand with an axe, necessitating amputation of the first two fingers above the second joint. Later he fought, and was wounded in the Battle of Chancellorsville. He was treated at the Regimental Hospital, then at Carver Hospital in Washington, D.C. before being transferred to the 3rd Company, 2nd Battalion of the Veteran’s Reserve Corp. He received a disability discharge on 25 July 1865. Both he, and later his widow, Susan, received a veteran’s pension. The History of the 141st Regiment, by (Rev.) David Craft, the Regiment’s Chaplain, mentions Orrin Coleman on pages 92 and 250.

After the Civil War the family lived on a farm near New Era in Bradford County. Their nine year old son, Homer, died on 26 November 1865, and is buried in the Methodist Church Cemetery in New Era. When the New Era Church was built in 1893, a stained glass window was installed in the memory of Orrin and Susan Coleman. His neighbors testified that Orrin was a good and respected citizen.

In February 1891, Orrin and Susan moved to Binghamton where Orrin died at the home of his daughter, Florence, in 1903. Orrin spelled his name Oren in later years, and his headstone reads Oren.

CHILDREN

1. David O., born 26 November 1848 in Bradford County, died 13 April 1923 in the Veteran’s Home in Bath, New York, buried in Floral Park Cemetery, Johnson City, NY with an inscribed headstone, married (1) Carrie Pipher (divorced in 1884), (2) Orpha Shores.

2. Mary A., born 10 October 1850 in Bradford County, died 19 August 1901 in Binghamton, buried in Floral Park Cemetery, Johnson City, New York with an inscribed headstone, married Joseph R. Billings on 10 October 1871.

3. Florence S., born 27 November 1854 in Bradford County, died 30 November 1919 in Olcott, New York, buried in Floral Park Cemetery, Johnson City, NY with an inscribed headstone, married Ludd Corbin.

4. Homer, born about 1856 in Bradford County, died 26 November 1865 in Bradford County, buried in New Era Cemetery with an inscribed headstone.

5. Martha, born 14 September 1858 in Bradford County, died 26 November 1865 in Bradford County, buried in Tioga Point Cemetery, Athens, Pennsylvania with an inscribed headstone, married (1) Rhinvolt, (2) L.H. Doud.

6. John Wesley, born 27 August 1861 in Bradford County, died 18 May 1947 in Punta Gorda, Florida, buried in Indian Springs Cemetery in Punta Gorda with an inscribed headstone, married (1) Mary Josephine Arnold on 9 November 1886 in Binghamton, (2) Theadora Berrian in Punta Gorda.

7. William H., born 15 May 1869 in Bradford County, died 16 January 1935 in Towanda, Pennsylvania, buried in Floral Park Cemetery with an inscribed headstone, married Inez M. Reddington.

************************

JOHN WESLEY COLEMAN, the son of Orrin H. Coleman and Susan B. Palmer, was born on 27 August 1861–the first year of the Civil War–in Terry Township, Bradford County, Pennsylvania. He died on 18 May 1947 in Punta Gorda, Florida, and is buried in the Indian Springs Cemetery in Punta Gorda with an inscribed headstone. He married (1) Mary Josephine Arnold, the daughter of (Rev.) Andrew Jackson Arnold and Josephine Whitaker, on 9 November 1886 in Binghamton, New York. She was born on 7 October 1868 in Warren Township, Bradford County, and died on 23 March 1923 in Binghamton. She is buried in Floral Park Cemetery in Johnson City, New York with an inscribed headstone. He married (2) Theadora B. Berrian in Punta Gorda. She died on 8 September 1962 and is buried next to her husband with an inscribed headstone.

J. Wesley Coleman attended school in Bradford County, and engaged in farming and lumbering until 1883 when he moved to Binghamton. He worked for the Wilkerson Manufacturing Company for twenty years, then engaged in the real estate and insurance business for four years while maintaining offices in the O’Neil Building and at 145 Washington Street in Binghamton. He next became a superintendent for different contractors until 1911 when he formed a partnership under the firm name of Davis and Coleman, Contractors and Builders. After devoting his time to government work during World War I, he organized the firm of J. Wesley Coleman and Sons, Contractors and Builders. The firm erected many business buildings and residences in Binghamton.

After the death of his wife, Mary, he relocated in Punta Gorda, Florida, where he was a contractor until the great depression of 1929. He then engaged in the real estate business, and owned and operated the Bright Spot Filling Station in Punta Gorda until his death.

He served as Alderman for the Sixth Ward of the City of Binghamton for six years. He was active inthe Masonic Order (32nd Degree), Odd Fellows, YMCA, Methodist Church, and the Chamber of Commerce in Binghamton and Punta Gorda. His will, dated 15 November 1946, was filed in Fort Myers, Florida on 22 May 1947.

CHILDREN BY FIRST MARRIAGE

1. Leon Andrew, born 23 June 1890 in Binghamton, died 6 July 1986 in Ingersol, Ontario, Canada, buried in Sylvan Abby Cemetery, Clearwater, Florida with an inscribed headstone, married Jean Lovell on 23 December 1920 in Toronto, Canada.

2. Clarence Orrin, born 1 August 1895 in Binghamton, died 13 January 1976 in Punta Gorda, buried in Indian Springs Cemetery in Punta Gorda with an inscribed headstone, married Mary E. Mitchell on 24 July 1926 in Punta Gorda.

3. Clayton Wesley, born 21 July 1897 in Binghamton, died 25 September 1959 in the Town of Vestal, Broome County, New York, buried in Chenango Valley Cemetery in Broome County with an inscribed headstone, married Minetta R. Worden on 26 July 1920 in Greene, NY.

4. Mytie Arnold, born 6 August 1899 in Binghamton, died 26 May 1966 in Punta Gorda, buried in Indian Springs Cemetery in Punta Gorda with an inscribed headstone, married (1) Ray Moore, (2) James Hyland.

*************************

CLAYTON WESLEY COLEMAN, the son of John Wesley Coleman and Mary Josephine Arnold, was born on 21 July 1897 in Binghamton, New York. He died on 25 September 1959 in the Town of Vestal, Broome County, New York and is buried in the Chenango Valley Cemetery in Broome County with an inscribed headstone. He married Minetta Rendle Worden, the daughter of Miner E. Worden and Elizabeth Ann Rendle, on 26 July 1920 in Greene, New York.

Clayton (Clayt) Coleman served in the U.S. Navy from 7 May 1918 to 18 September 1919, during World War I. He was stationed at Pelem Bay, and made 16 transatlantic round trips as a Seaman First Class aboard the troop transport U.S.S. DeKalb. He was a journeyman bricklayer and plaster mason, and died from a heart attack while laying brick.[NOTE: Grandpa Coleman died on a mason scaffold while laying brick for the Joint Binghamton-Johnson City Sewage Treatment Plant. He died in the arms of his son-in-law, Robert A. Hogan who was laying brick alongside him. – Daniel M. Hogan] During the great depression of the early 1930’s he worked for the federal government, training young men in the Civil[ian] Conservation Corps (CCC) to be masons. He, and later his widow, received a veteran’s pension.

Clayt was outgoing, friendly, and independent–his own man. He sang often, was always an early riser, and loved to work. he was basically a contented man, and was particularly fond of his children and grandchildren. He lived most of his life in Binghamton, except for short periods of time in Niagara Falls and Syracuse, New York.

Minetta (Etta) Worden was born on 20 February 1898 in Scranton, Pennsylvania, and died 11 June 1984 in the Town of Chenango, Broome County [New York]. She is buried next to her husband with an inscribed headstone. Etta was a housewife and mother. She was always there, always cared, and was always a lady.

CHILDREN

1. Clayton Worden, born 21 April 1922 in Binghamton, married Beverly J. Meagher on 19 August 1948 in Johnson City, New York.

2. Betty Jane, born 27 December 1923 in Binghamton, married Douglas G. Wood on 8 September 1945 in Johnson City, New York. Douglas Wood died on 24 November 2000 in Binghamton, New York at the age of 81.

3. Doris Helen, born 15 May 1929 in Binghamton, married Robert A. Hogan on 10 April 1948 in Johnson City, New York.

*******************

DORIS HELEN COLEMAN, the daughter of Clayton Wesley Coleman and Minetta Rendle Worden, was born on 15 May 1929 in Binghamton, New York. She married Robert A. Hogan, the son of Edward M. Hogan and Clara L. Trevethick, on 10 April 1948 in Johnson City, New York. He was born on 9 April 1929 in Johnson City.

Doris is outgoing, friendly, and loves people. Aside from raising her family, she found time to manage a hosiery store [NOTE: Parklane Hosiery, in the Vestal Plaza] before being employed by IBM Corporation in a highly specialized job with authority over other employees. She enjoys socializing, and likes to travel.

Robert (Red) Hogan graduated from Johnson City High School in 1946. He served from 1946 to 1948 in the U.S. Navy, and an additional year in 1951. He worked as a bricklayer before entering the teaching profession as a Vocational Education Teacher. He received a Bachelors degree in Vocational Education from the State University of New York at Utica/Rome in 1980, and a Masters degree in Vocational Studies from the same school in 1981. He then received a Masters degree in School Administration in 1982 from the University of Scranton. Red was active in the Knights of Columbus, and enjoyed golf, politics, and socializing.


Copyright © Hogans3 – All Rights Reserved – Daniel M. Hogan – dan@hogans3.org
NOTE:  As with any research, the above is subject to change.  If you have questions on my research, additions, corrections, etc., please feel free to contact me at dan@hogans3.org – I would love to hear from you.

Advertisements

One thought on “Coleman Lineage

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s